Meet Pamela Wight

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This week I welcome Pamela Wight to Reade and Write. Pam is the author of The Right Wrong Man and Twin Desires and I’m thrilled to have her on my blog! Bonus: I might even get to meet her this summer!

Tell me about your books.

I’ve published two romantic suspense novels: The Right Wrong Man and Twin Desires. What’s interesting is that the two main female characters in these books are extremely different from each other: Meredith (The Right Wrong Man) is feisty, funny, and self-confident. Sandra (Twin Desires) is shy, quiet, and unaware of her attractiveness.

The Right Wrong Man    Twin Desires

Who is the audience for your books?

Originally I thought my books would be read mostly by women; however, I dislike the phrase “women’s fiction,” because women read thrillers by men – like Harlan Coben and David Baldacci – so why shouldn’t men enjoy fast-paced mysteries and thrillers written by women? Turns out that they do! I’ve had many men read both of my books and enjoy them (and write great reviews).

Tell me about the setting of Twin Desires—how did you choose it, what kind of research did you have to do, why did you choose it?

I wrote Twin Desires (with co-author Ashley Brandt) while I was living in the San Francisco Bay area, and it’s set in San Francisco and the beautiful coastal area of Stinson Beach. I ran the same streets that Sandra does in the book and visited an adorable cottage with a water view in the town of Stinson, a house much like the one Sandra is holed up in against her will.

What was the hardest thing about writing the book?

You may think I’ll say writing with a co-author, but the opposite is true. Ashley and I had such fun plotting out the obstacles that Sandra and main man Blake Worthington fought through. As co-authors, we were on the ‘same page,’ so to speak, about our characters and built an entire storyline about them, so we knew what to expect from them. But, as always, the characters surprised us and changed the plot as the suspense thickened. I think the hardest thing about writing the book was ending it – we didn’t want to say goodbye to these characters!

If your book were made into a movie, who would you like to see playing the main characters?

Emily Stone would be a perfect Sandra Eastman in Twin Desires.
Ben Affleck is a good actor, and handsome, so he would play both Blake and Alex Worthington with aplomb. I can see the film in my mind’s eye, and it’s fabulous!

Emily Stone  Ben Affleck

⦁ Have you written any other books? And are you in one or more critique groups or partnerships?

I wrote The Right Wrong Man after Twin Desires (but published it first). I created scenes in 2-4 page ‘pods,’ then would file it away, busy with my paying job and raising a family. Finally, I got serious with finishing it and formed a critique group. We four writers met every two weeks for two hours for over a year. Taking turns, at one meeting two of us would print out and read three new chapters, which the others marked up and commented on them. Two weeks later, it was the other two writers’ turn. This critiquing was invaluable to me in fine-tuning and completing my book. I published it in 2013 as an e-book, then in a softback edition.

Do you write every day?

Yes.

When you read a book, what authors do you like best? What genres do you like best?

I like all (fiction) genres. If the book is well-written, I soak it in. As Ray Bradbury wrote in his book about writing: “Read those authors who write the way you hope to write, those who think the way you would like to think. But also read those who do not think as you think or write as you want to write, and so be stimulated in directions you might not take for many years.”

Where would you like to go more than anywhere else on earth?

At my New England writing table, with the window open overlooking forest and overhearing bird calls, I travel to San Francisco and Cambridge, the Caribbean and Switzerland, Hawaii and Florence, as well as destinations unknown.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Write. Read. Write. Read. Here at Reade and Write, I agree!

What is your favorite movie and why?

My first immediate answer is “Gone with the Wind.” I know it’s not PC now, but back when I was 11 and first saw the movie, I fell in love with the characters, the romance, the angst of unrequited love, and the reality of not seeing what’s right in front of you. I’ve watched the move over a dozen times since then, and receive the same reactions each time.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Write more. Read more. Write more. Read more.

Describe yourself in three words.

Creative. Loving. Kind.

Where can readers connect with you?

Website: www.roughwighting.net
Facebook: http://facebook.com/roughwighting
Twitter: https://twitter.com/pamelawight
Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/pamelawight
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pam94920/

Where can readers find your books?

The Right Wrong Man is available in e-book and softback from Amazon (click here for link).
Twin Desires was published in e-book form in 2014, and the book’s second edition is available as softback on Amazon (click here for link), July, 2016.

Author Biography: Pamela Wight is a successful author of romantic suspense. Her first novel, The Right Wrong Man, got rave reviews for taking readers “on an exciting adventure with lots of intrigue, unexpected plot twists, and romance.” A year later, Wight published her second novel, Twin Desires, with Ashley Brandt as an e-book in 2014, and available in paperback in July, 2016.

Pamela earned her MA in English from Drew University, continued with postgraduate work at UC Berkeley in publishing, and teaches creative writing classes in Boston and San Francisco.

She lives in the Boston area with her “right man” and hikes the New England trails while concocting her third novel, As Lovely as a Lie. Wight travels frequently to the San Francisco Bay area for additional inspiration. She speaks to book clubs in both locations. Many readers enjoy her “weekly blog on daily living” called Roughwighting.

Thank you, Pam, for appearing on Reade and Write today!

Until next week,

Amy

 

 

 

 

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76 comments on “Meet Pamela Wight

  1. Great interview! I love reading about my favorite bloggers’ writing lives. 🙂 Your books sound awesome, and I agree with your opinion on women’s fiction. I’m glad that men read and review your work!

    Like

    • amreade says:

      Hi Kate,

      Thanks for stopping by- I’m glad you enjoyed the interview! I agree that Pam’s books sound great. I can’t wait to dig in and start reading!

      Like

  2. reocochran says:

    Blogging is a blessing when you meet sources of writing inspiration! I enjoy reading many authors but funny thing is, Pam and I relate on subjects such as family and humorous subject matters. 🙂

    I think people’s heart and soul come through their writing. This was a warm collection of questions given by Amy, with interesting answers responded back by Pam. Great connections!

    Like

    • amreade says:

      I’m so glad you enjoyed the interview. I’ve found the blogging community to be supportive, fun, and inspirational. There are so many bloggers doing so many things out there- it’s really hard to keep up. The best part of it for me is being able to meet new people who visit my blog and who appear on my blog in interviews and guest posts. Thanks for dropping in!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Great interview…I enjoyed.

    Like

  4. Annika Perry says:

    Lovely interview with Pamela; great selection of questions and answers. So enjoyed getting to know more about you, Pamela.I had to smile at how hard it was for you to finish the book and say goodbye to your characters. Sometimes when reading a book I love and when the characters have woven their way into my heart I will read slower, wanting to delay the separation! Wonderful places to travel to and thought-provoking quote from Ray Bradbury. Wishing you much joy in your reading and writing! 😀😃

    Like

    • amreade says:

      Hi Annika, thanks for your thoughtful comments! I’m so glad you enjoyed the interview. I feel the same way about saying good-bye to characters I read about. That’s why I love series, I guess- so I don’t have to say good-bye! Thanks for visiting.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks Annika. Yes, I loved Amy’s questions; they gave me a chance to really think about my writing and how I feel about my characters. I prefer reading novels to short stories for that reason – I don’t want to say goodbye to the characters at the end of a good book. I’m hoping my readers will feel the same way about ‘my people’ in The Right Wrong Man and Twin Desires. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Great interview 🙂 Thanks for helping us get to know Pam a little more, and nibble up some juicy writing tips at the same time – wonderful! Harula x

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Gerlinde says:

    What a great interview, I enjoyed learning more about one of my favorite bloggers.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Love the interview and discovering h-i-d-d-e-n-s: additional aspects about you. All intriguing. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Terrific interview! We love Pam. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  9. carlamcgill says:

    Very nice interview. Love the brief and helpful advice too.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Nice to get to know you and your work better, Pam.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. As Lovely as A Lie – Super title! Fantastic interview! 🙂 Both in questions and answers!

    Liked by 2 people

    • amreade says:

      I love that title, too, Carol. I’m glad you liked the interview!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Carol. I’m not even a third through ‘the making’ of this third book, but each chapter begins with a simile, so I knew the title would need to be a simile also. And believe me, it goes perfectly with the theme and plot of this book. Do you think a title can help us authors get even more inspired while writing a book?

      Liked by 2 people

      • That’s a very good question, Pam. In my case my titles tended to come after I’d written at least the first draft but in your case, since you’re beginning each chapter with a simile (a neat structural technique, I think) having your title might very well act as a reminder that keeps you focused.
        Being a third through a book is pretty amazing. It’s difficult to know exactly where inspiration comes from and sometimes it’s in getting down to the writing that we become inspired.
        There are days that we’re not inspired and maybe those are the days we need to work on different parts of the book – such as chapter titles, our acknowledgement page, the blurb (Oh, that takes a lot of inspiration)…
        You seem to be well tracked in that you have the theme and plot of your book. Happy Writing. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  12. Just bought both your books, Pam. Looking forward to enjoying them on my Kindle.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. What a lovely interview, Pam! I smiled when I saw Emma Stone. She was the actress I chose to play my character Samantha. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nurse Kelly says:

    Great interview! I really admire Pam’s writing. Looking forward to reading her books! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. robincoyle says:

    I just ordered your books! I am getting on an airplane in about two hours and now will have you to take along with me! Great interview . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  16. […] Source: My Desire Is Your Desire! […]

    Liked by 1 person

  17. davecenker says:

    As an aspiring first time novelist, it’s always great (and valuable) to get insight from someone who has been successful with it. And with someone as well-versed with the written word as Pamela is, it becomes all that more beneficial and enjoyable. Thanks to both of you for sharing this interview 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Darlene says:

    Excellent interview with a talented writer and great person! Always great to learn more about the writers you follow.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. russtowne says:

    I’m delighted to have had the opportunity to learn more about you!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Reblogged this on roughwighting and commented:
    My Desire Is Your Desire. Twin Desires, now available in softback. Amazon. Many thanks to Amy of Reade and Write for interviewing me about my writing, my muse, and my stories.

    Like

  21. augie says:

    I enjoyed this post, I will return. Great meeting Pamela. When I hear success stories of self-pub I’m amazed (I’m not gutty enough, yet)

    Liked by 1 person

    • amreade says:

      Hi Augie,

      Thanks for stopping by! Pam is a dynamo, isn’t she? If you’re thinking about self-publishing, I say go for it! There’s a lot to learn, but the sooner you start, the sooner you’ll see your words in print. Good luck!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you much, Augie. Yes, it’s a long learning curve, self-publishing. But the challenge, and the freedom of publishing your own work, is so worth it.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. So, Tuesday went a little downhill for me, and I just got back here today! I have never been a romance reader,but as you know, I have crossed all genres in the past year!

    When I realized who you were interviewing I was thrilled! I often wondered why you have not interviewed Pam.

    I am a fan of Pam’s blog! I read a posting one day, and was so into it, that I was mad when it ended. I felt like I had just read the first chapter of a good book!

    Definitely gonna add Pam to my TBR. Not sure why I haven’t done so already!

    Have a great day ladies, and don’t forget to “Keep Reading and Wrighting!”

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Thank you, Amy, for interviewing and introducing me to your readers. I always enjoy visiting you ‘on-line’ and look forward to meeting you in ‘real time’ in August! The softback edition of Twin Desires will be available starting July 1.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Great interview. So fun to learn about fellow blogger and writer, Pam. I have on of Pam’s books already and will be starting it soon 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  25. lindamthorne says:

    Interesting story about putting out the two books. I liked your input about men reading Women’s Fiction. I wish we could stop using that term. I think it deters male readers. There’s no reason for them not to like the same books we do unless the book is tagged with a genre that suggests they wouldn’t like it. At first I thought you’d misspelled the writer’s last name as it’s so close to “write.” Wight and Reade instead of Write and Read.

    Liked by 3 people

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