Reading Round-Up: September Edition

This was another great month for great books! I’ve got seven to share with you this week, and I’m well into the first book that I’ll share with you at the end of October.

I hope you’ll share your own reads in the comments below!

The first book of the month was The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch. I wish I had read this book when it was first published in 2008. There’s more wisdom and inspiration packed into this this volume than I would have thought possible. Randy Pausch gave his last lecture shortly before he passed away from pancreatic cancer, and this book was his gift to his children. I think it should be required reading for college students—and everyone else. Fair warning: it’s a tear-jerker. Read my review here.

 

Lou's Tattoos: A Comedy of Errors by [Iris Chacon]

I knew I would enjoy Lou’s Tattoos, A Comedy of Errors by Iris Chacon before the first page. I’ve loved every book I’ve read by Iris Chacon. Her characters are well-drawn and quirky, her scenarios are delightfully far-fetched yet plausible, and they are just so much fun to read. I read this in one sitting, as I recall I did with the last book I read by her…it seems to be a habit of mine when I read her books. Read my review here.

 

The Lions of Fifth Avenue: A Novel by [Fiona Davis]

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis is a book that will have library and architecture lovers swooning at the descriptions of the New York Public Library in the early twentieth century. The book slides between 1913 (and a few years afterward) and the late 1990s, and I enjoyed the different points of view. Read my review here.

 

Very British Problems Abroad

You may recall that I read Very British Problems by Rob Temple back in January (you can read the post here). And while Very British Problems Abroad wasn’t quite as funny as the first book, it was still quite an enjoyable read. My review can be found here.

 

The Innocents (The Innocents Mystery Series Book 1) by [C. A. Asbrey]

The Innocents by C.A. Asbrey was the kind of book I’d love to read again because I enjoyed it that much. It was fun, there were some laugh-out-loud moments, it was exciting, and I loved that the main characters were so taken with each other, though on different sides of the law. I highly recommend this one. Read my review here.

 

Florence Adler Swims Forever: A Novel by [Rachel Beanland]

Next up was the book club read you all chose! Florence Adler Swims Forever by Rachel Beanland was a fascinating read, made even more interesting for me and, I suspect, the people in my book club, because we live so close to Atlantic City, where the story takes place in the 1930s. To recap the plot if you don’t recall, it’s the story of a young woman who drowns off the coast of Atlantic City and the decision by her mother to keep her death a secret from the young woman’s sister, who is in the hospital on strict bed rest for a high-risk pregnancy. You all did a great job picking this book! Read my review here

 

Hearth Fires (The Haunted Book 1) by [Bibiana Krall, Veronica Cline Barton]

Hearth Fires, Book 1 in The Haunted series, is a collection of short stories by Bibiana Krall and Veronica Cline Barton. Full disclosure, these are the two terrific ladies with whom I share the BookEm show on YouTube. I love their writing styles, which are very different from each other, and this book was a fun way to get into the spirit of Halloween. With their Ouija board themes, these stories are spooky, dark, and atmospheric. Read my review here

So what have you been reading?

Until next time,

Amy

17 comments on “Reading Round-Up: September Edition

  1. I’m so upset with you Amy. Each of these books sounds like ones I’d really like to read. Every One! I’m going to have to put them on my list in my docket for Amazon and my library and stay up later at night I suppose. The good news is the TV is so non-interesting to me that I find I am reading instead. Reading is a great way to avoid the political ugliness that we can see on our TV screen every day. I’ll go with fiction instead! I’ve been reading some very intense books the last few weeks. The one I’m reading right now is called The Amateur Marriage by Ann Tyler. I believe she published it in the early 2000s-maybe 2004? But I had missed it. It is intense and deeply relational and a very good literary read.

    Like

    • amreade says:

      I’m sure my TBR looks a lot like yours, Pam. I keep adding and adding to it, hoping to get to all of them at some point. We’ve been watching Schitt’s Creek with our eldest—that show is hilarious. But that’s the only tv I watch. Reading is far preferable, as you say.

      I’m going to take a look at The Amateur Marriage. It sounds amazing.

      Have a great day! xo

      Liked by 1 person

  2. dgkaye says:

    I love your recommends Amy, thank you for introducing me to some more gems, no doubt. 🙂 x

    Like

  3. CarolCooks2 says:

    A good selection for us to peruse…Thank you Amy 🙂 x

    Like

  4. Jim Borden says:

    I really enjoyed The Last Lecture…

    Like

  5. A terrific selection Amy… thanks for recommending.. xx

    Like

  6. Pat Wahler says:

    Amy, you must stop adding books to my TBR pile at once! (Just kidding) This looks like another stellar crop.

    Like

  7. Darlene says:

    You’ve read some great books here. I just finished reading Barbara Kingsolver’s The Prodigal Summer, which was excellent, and With Love, There is Hope, Stories about the 2020 Pandemic. Thoughts and stories from all over the world which was interesting.

    Like

    • amreade says:

      Those all sound good, Darlene. I was talking to someone the other night who mentioned The Poisonwood Bible. That’s another one I’d like to read. The stories from all over the world would give a really amazing insight into how people have coped with the pandemic.

      Like

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