A Deadly Game

Rock Paper Scissors by Matty Dalrymple

I listened to the audiobook version of this thriller while I was on a long drive, and every time I had to get out of the car I couldn’t wait to get back to hear more of the story. It’s gripping—if I had been reading the paperback or even the ebook version, I would have called it a page-turner.

There’s something special about Lizzy Ballard, and that’s not necessarily a good thing. Her special ability has been the proximate cause and the direct cause of the deaths of two loved ones, and she’s afraid of her own reactions to the events and people around her–that is, once everyone starts to figure out exactly what’s going on.

The threads connecting the characters in this story are both both believable and fascinating. There’s something in the book for everyone who loves thrillers: there’s blackmail, bookies, murder, scheming power brokers, questionable medical ethics, and innocence. There’s wealth and want. There’s a teenager with a desire for friends and a normal life, and there’s the guardian who’s willing to do anything to protect his young charge.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who reads thrillers and who is open to the idea that we haven’t yet discovered everything there is to know about the human mind. An exceptional read.

*One quick note: from now on, I’ll be linking the photo of the book’s cover to its Amazon page so interested readers can buy the book directly. And for people who want to know more about the author or prefer to buy books at etailers other than Amazon, I’ll also be linking the author’s website to his or her name in the heading at the top of the page.

Going Undercover

Undercover: Crime Shorts by Jane Risdon

I’ve had the pleasure of reading many blog posts written by Jane Risdon and quite a few interviews featuring her and her work. Her career has taken some fascinating turns, including rock star management and a stint in the UK government as part of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Undercover: Crime Shorts is a page-turning collection of standalone short stories, each of which is totally unique and gives the reader a taste of Risdon’s writerly imagination and wide-ranging storytelling skills.

There are six stories in the collection, not including the tantalizing teaser for the first book in Risdon’s not-yet-released series, Ms. Birdsong Investigates.

On to the stories. Each one is different, but they all share the same voice of intrigue, trickery, and an unsettling sense of danger.

Sweet Sable: The Red Siren is a story of revenge. I would not want to find myself on Sable’s bad side.

Apartment 206c is a frightening and mindbending tale of what can happen when we pry into other people’s business;

Murder by Christmas is an ingenious example of the lengths one person will go to in order to get what he or she wants (and my favorite story in the collection);

The Watchers is an all-too-real glimpse of a stalker’s prey and one that will remind you to keep your blinds closed at night.

The Honey Trap is one of the shorter stories in the book and a terrifying look into the world of international espionage and misogyny;

The Look is another story of revenge, but differs from the first book in the collection because there’s a certain element of poetic justice in the conclusion.

CAVEAT: This is a gritty collection and if cozy mysteries represent the extent of the sex and violence you’ll tolerate in a mystery, most of these stories are not for you.

I would recommend this book to anyone who likes short mysteries that explore dark issues, readers who like strong female protagonists, and readers who appreciate morally conflicted main characters. Not all the stories have all these traits, but in general I believe these are solid characterizations.

Until next time,

Amy

A Stranger’s Death

By Strangers Mourned by John Lindermuth

“By Strangers Mourn’d” is a line from a poem by Alexander Pope. Not only is it a beautiful poem, but the line is an apt title for this book, which starts off with the death of a young woman who is unknown to everyone in the town of Arahpot, Pennsylvania, in 1899. Her remains have been found in a creek outside town and it is obvious she was murdered. It is Sheriff Sylvester Tilghman’s job to find the killer.

But other crime doesn’t stop because the sheriff is busy solving a murder, and Tilghman has his hands full with problems in Arahpot that have nothing to do with the woman’s murder—or do they? With the help of his deputy, Cyrus, Tilghman works tirelessly to deal with the problems that crop up in his small jurisdiction, from a young boy who’s been shot to a constituent who’s constantly carping that the sheriff is spending too much time looking for the murderer of a woman who was just passing through town—and an immigrant woman at that.

Readers of my blog may recall that I’ve reviewed books by John Lindermuth in the past and enjoyed them, which is part of the reason I had a feeling I would like this one. When John asked me to read the book and write a review, it was a no-brainer for me.

The characters in this book are multi-faceted and likable (well, at least the good guys are likable, and even a couple of the bad guys are, too) and the story moves at a nice clip. Not too fast, not too slow. The reader gets an opportunity to get to know the town of Arahpot and its inhabitants, and there’s even some insight into how people around the turn of the twentieth century felt about some of the innovations of the day, such as the telephone and ragtime music.

Historical fiction from this time period requires good old-fashioned police work to bring the killer to justice. There can be no dependence on DNA or fingerprints or technical crime scene investigation to help law enforcement draw a net around the killer, and Lindermuth relies handily on Tilghman’s intuition, experience, and practical know-how to catch the killer. But it’s not an easy job, and there’s plenty of danger lurking in the story, waiting to ensnare lawmen who let their guards down.

The story is well-plotted and has a subtle complexity that hints at undercurrents of class and ethnic differences. I would recommend By Strangers Mourned to anyone who loves a good historical mystery with plenty of peril and great dialogue.

When John Lindermuth asked me to review the book, he also offered to provide a guest post to accompany the review. What follows is his brief post, which is a perfect complement to the thoughts I’ve shared about the book.

***

Early mining operations in Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal region were the work of amateurs. Those who owned the mines and hoped to profit from them soon realized the need for experienced miners.

Competition began for the available supply of English, Welsh, and Scots-Irish miners who had learned their skills in the old country. Irish immigrants who fled the Potato Famine of the 1840s filled a variety of unskilled jobs above and below ground. They sent word home about opportunities and their number greatly increased. Many Germans also worked in the mines, though more were employed at carpentry, as blacksmiths, and in other related fields supplemental to mining. By the second generation, many of the Irish had learned the mining trade and the English and Welsh moved into supervisory positions.

In the decades that followed as miners began agitating for unions to improve their working conditions and lives, mine owners began seeking cheaper and more manageable labor. This led them abroad where their agents began recruiting Eastern Europeans, many of whom did not speak English and were eager to accept work at rates lower than those demanded by domestic laborers.

In doing my research I discovered these European agencies also recruited young women to work in silk mills, other factories, and as domestics in homes. As is the case now, there were those unscrupulous predators who took advantage of the unwary. This provided the impetus for By Strangers Mourned.

A primary goal in writing historical and other fiction is to entertain the reader. But, if I can offer some insight into what life was like for our ancestors I hope it will be a bonus the reader will appreciate.

A Suspenseful Humdinger

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

My daughter borrowed this book from the library. I wasn’t going to read it because the last book I read by Ruth Ware, The Death of Mrs. Westaway, didn’t knock my socks off the way I hoped it would (which is not to say it was a bad book–to the contrary, I gave it four stars–but I had hoped for more).

But, long story short and as you’ve no doubt already guessed, I decided to read The Turn of they Key. And boy, am I glad I did.

Here’s a quick summary: Rowan Caine accepts a dream job as a live-in nanny at an isolated house deep in the Highlands of Scotland. The owners, a husband and wife team of architects, are desperate for a nanny who can start work as soon as possible. They have four daughters, three of whom are very young and live in the house, and one who only comes home from boarding school on breaks. Each of the girls presents her own particular set of challenges, and these are all made worse by the atmosphere of the “smart” house, which is outfitted with a complicated and highly invasive security system, lighting system, sound system, and every other system you can think of.

It is obvious early on that Rowan is hiding something. Likewise, it becomes clear that she’s not the only one harboring secrets. What made the four previous nannies abandon the position in the past year alone (one even leaving behind her belongings in her haste to get out), and why is there a malevolence in the house directed squarely at Rowan?

And, most importantly, why is Rowan in prison for the murder of one of the children?

This book is more of a modern-day Gothic than The Death of Mrs. Westaway. The house itself plays a huge role in the story. I read some passages with bated breath and others with a strong feeling of sympathy for the trials Rowan is experiencing at the hands of her new family. From sounds blaring out of the stereo system in the middle of the night to lights being on where Rowan knows she shut them off, to an extremely creepy garden on the property, the whole atmosphere of the story is one of dread and uneasy apprehension.

There are also red herrings aplenty, which I love in a mystery. Because Rowan has no idea where the hostility is coming from, (almost) everyone is a suspect. And the ending took me completely by surprise, which I also love. I feel like I should have seen it coming, which makes for fair play in a book like this one, and that made me enjoy it all the more.

The one thing I felt was a little off was the way in which the narrative is presented—that is, in the form of a letter (a very, very long letter) to a lawyer (barrister in the UK), begging him to take her case. As the reader learns almost immediately, Rowan is writing the letter from inside a women’s penitentiary. The letter format, I think, works best at the very end of the book, where the reader finds several letters written by other people that bring the story to a satisfying conclusion.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a good Gothic mystery tinged with more than a hint of psychological suspense.

It Could Happen to Anyone

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

My book club read this novel for our May meeting and I loved it. I never watched (and won’t watch) the HBO series based on the book, and I’m glad I didn’t. I formed a very clear picture of each character in my mind, and I wouldn’t want that to be distorted by HBO’s casting choices.

This is not a mystery, a thriller, a crime novel, or domestic suspense, but there are elements of all those subgenres. I would call it a book of suspense. You know there’s a dead body, but you don’t know who it is until the very end. Likewise, you know one of the characters is the killer, but you don’t find out that person’s identity until the end, either.

Big Little Lies tells the story of a group of kindergarten moms: how they feel about their spouses, themselves, each other, and of course, their kids. And not just how they feel about everyone else, but how they treat everyone else. There’s bullying going on in the school, and it mirrors the bullying going on among the parents—both men and women. Of course, (most of) the adult bullies are far more subtle than the kids, but their digs and barbs cut as deep as any physical wound. A particularly nasty petition drawn up by some of the parents circulates, and battle lines are drawn based on who signs and who doesn’t.

As the story unfolds, it is clear that something sinister has taken place at the school’s Trivia Night. The action in the story starts six months before the Trivia Night, and the suspense ratchets up as the clock ticks down to the night in question.

The three main characters in the book are Madeline, Jane, and Celeste. They form a friendship from an early chapter in the book and they couldn’t be more different. Madeline is fiesty and not afraid to give voice to her thoughts. Jane is the young mom, a newcomer to town. She’s quiet and hangs onto a deep-seated feeling of shame over a life-changing event that took place several years before the book starts. Celeste is beautiful and generous with her friendship and her money, but is hiding an ugly secret.

There are numerous secondary characters, all of whom are important to the story. In fact, readers learn a great deal about the main characters from their interactions with the secondary characters. There is even a cast of tertiary characters, and these are the ones who share their thoughts and opinions about the plot of the book. They’re fascinating and they reveal a lot about human nature.

The novel is an attention-getting and disturbing exploration of domestic violence, the abuse of women, bullying, the age-old and often-unspoken tug-of-war between working moms and stay-at-home moms, and the innermost thoughts of a group of mothers bound together by tragedy, circumstance, and the place they call home. It’s both easy and hard to read: easy in the sense that the book is written in plain language that leaves little room for doubt; hard in the sense that it addresses topics that are scary and difficult to discuss.

The author does an incredible job showing the waffling, back-and-forth thoughts that run through the mind of the abused wife in the book, and that serves as a tacit and sad-but-common explanation of some of the reasons behind Why Women Stay.

I don’t want to spoil the ending, but I will say that I was satisfied by it. I didn’t guess the person who died until just before the reader sees it happen, and I certainly did not guess the perpetrator.

In sum, this is a book about human behavior. Every society, every community, every school, has parents and kids like the ones in the story. There are good people and reprehensible ones (sometimes they’re the same person). It is a story of hope and hanging on.

I would recommend the book to anyone who likes psychological or domestic suspense with sharp, often witty, dialogue. If you have read it or watched the HBO show based on it, please let me know what you thought of it.

A Mystery of Old San Francisco

No Refuge from the Grave by Nancy Herriman

I have so missed Celia and Nick!

In this meticulously researched book, the reader is transported back to nineteenth-century San Francisco, where nurse Celia Davies and Detective Nick Greaves pair up once again to solve a baffling string of crimes that include murder and arson.

When Celia Davies and an acquaintance stumble upon the dead body of a well-known loan shark on the front lawn of the acquaintance’s house, Celia is propelled into the investigation into the man’s murder and the mystery of what he was doing at that particular house on the night of his death.

Strangely, at the time of the man’s murder, Nick is investigating a fire that he is convinced was a case of arson, committed as part of an insurance fraud scheme. It just so happens that the insurance agent whom Nick suspects is the very same person who owns the house where the loan shark was found.

And when another body is discovered in the same neighborhood, the clues become even more confounding as Celia and Nick try to piece together the threads of a crime that goes deeper than anyone suspected.

Oh, and Celia’s husband is there to make life even more difficult…again.

This tale goes from the comfort and opulence of the places frequented by San Francisco’s wealthy and influential to the seedy areas of the city where money changes hands in the dark and nefarious deeds are part of everyday life.

The characters in this book are brilliantly drawn and play off each other’s strengths and weaknesses in a way that is engaging and kept me turning the pages. Celia is strong (and headstrong!) and brave, but she knows she’s going to need Nick’s help to get through this puzzle. And Nick—well, he knows he needs Celia’s help and insights, but his feelings for her make it difficult for him to be around her.

If you like historical novels with three-dimensional characters, witty and sharp dialogue, an ingenious mystery, and a perfect denouement, you will love this book. I highly recommend it. You don’t have to start at the beginning of the series, but if you do, that makes the reading experience even richer.

A Bewitching Read

Sister of Wales by Cynthia Raleigh

Yarrow Pickering is the proprietor of the Lanthorne Ordinary, an inn located in the small hamlet of Milthorpe, Connecticut, in the 17th century. She’s also a skilled and gifted healer, an herb woman, and a witch.

In this second book of the Lanthorne Ordinary series by Cynthia Raleigh, Yarrow finds a glass orb nestled in the sand along the beach not far from her home. Upon close examination of the object, Yarrow knows this orb is more than simply a glass bauble. Its center is glowing and it is wrapped in a tattered piece of fabric that had obviously belonged to someone at one time.

Yarrow’s discovery of the orb sets in motion a series of otherworldly events that have Yarrow concerned for her own safety, as well as that of her sister and the villagers of Milthorpe.

First, a villager is attacked by a beast no one seems to be able to identify. It’s too big to be a wolf…but what else can it be?

Then the injured villager and his wife go missing under suspicious and eerie circumstances: will either of them be seen again? Where did they go and why did they leave the village?

The arrival of an English ship in the harbor of Milthorpe is reason for excitement among the villagers, but at least one of the passengers seems to have business with Yarrow. Who is he and what information does he seek? Is he there for good or for evil?

I could go on, but I won’t because I want you to read this engaging and riveting story for yourself. I said this (among other good things) when I reviewed the first book in the Lanthorne Ordinary series, Summoning the Winds: I am not normally a reader of paranormal or supernatural fiction. But as with Summoning the Winds, I could not put this book down. Cynthia Raleigh is a masterful storyteller with an uncanny knack for description and setting. The reader feels Yarrow’s trepidation, unease, and fear as she faces the prospect of confronting the beast in the woods, as well as certain people in the village who may turn out to be friend or foe.

This story reaches back into the legends of Yarrow’s Welsh ancestors as she learns more about her mother’s legacy and her own responsibility as an herbal woman. The tale does not disappoint.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves suspense, dark secrets, historical fiction, and a story that unfolds like a beautiful tapestry from the past. You need not be a lover of paranormal or supernatural fiction to love the story, which is lush with legend.

The Bee’s Knees

Aconite, Queen of Poisons by L.M. Jorden

This mystery featuring main character Dr. Josephine Reva is captivating enough, but knowing it is based on the real life of the author’s grandmother, the first female doctor in Brooklyn, NY, makes the story even more delightful.

It’s the Roaring 20s. The world is changing rapidly, and with those changes come disputes over everything from alcohol use to public health to a woman’s place in society. Enter Dr. Reva, a determined young woman who rose from a Little Italy orphanage under the tutelage of Mother Cabrini to become a medical doctor. She stands up for what she thinks, she is vocal in expressing her belief that the medical profession needs more female doctors, she’s whip-smart, and she’s an all-around spitfire. I liked her from the first page.

When a dead body is found not far from Dr. Reva’s home in Brooklyn, she arrives on the scene thinking she can provide medical help. She’s too late for that, but she realizes the victim is someone she knows. In fact, it’s someone she had just spoken with mere hours before his death.

It’s not long before the detective working the case fixes his sights on Dr. Reva, in part because the victim died from poisoning by a plant—and it just so happens Dr. Reva is a student of homeopathy and the use of plant derivatives to promote health and healing.

Things go downhill from there for Dr. Reva. She’s been framed, and she is forced to start asking questions and investigating on her own behalf before she ends up in prison. And when a second victim is found dead, the race is on to find the real killer before he or she can strike again.

This mystery was such a fun read. Not only did I love Dr. Reva, but I found that the secondary characters added rich layers of texture to the story, too. Reading about their relationships with the doctor lent insights into the doctor’s personality and gave me even more reasons to root for her.

The pacing was perfect. The action builds up steadily with the mounting number of suspects, and it was thrilling to read about the simultaneous exhilaration and danger of visiting speakeasies and poking around in some rather seedy places.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a strong female sleuth, mysteries set in the 1920s, and a terrific and unique whodunit.

A Delightful English Mystery

Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin

I normally read Christmas books in the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas, but I picked this one up well after the new year. I had seen it advertised on Amazon and I liked the look of the manor on the cover. Plus, the blurb says the book is a mixture of Agatha Christie and Downton Abbey, with a bit of Wodehouse and “a dog of distinction.” Um, four of my favorite things mixed together? Yes, please!

Major Heathcliff Lennox finds a man’s body on his doorstep one wintry day. He has no idea whose body it is or what the man may have been doing at Lennox’s house. The lining of the dead man’s jacket holds a piece of paper with a woman’s name written on it. Lennox tells the police he does not recognize the name, but in truth he knows very well who the woman is.

When Lennox reluctantly accepts an invitation to spend Christmas at Melrose Court with his uncle, Lord Charles Melrose, he is startled to find some unexpected guests staying there—some welcome, some not. And when the first murder at Melrose Court occurs and Lennox finds himself the prime suspect, things start to go downhill.

And while he’s at his uncle’s estate, Lennox just might find a connection to the dead man on his doorstep.

As you may have guessed from the art deco cover elements, this mystery is set during the 1920s. It’s got everything a good English mystery should have: a big, old manor house, a cast of characters that includes people both crusty and beguiling, and a good deal of snow. There’s also Mr. Fogg, (Lennox’s dog), a juicy connection to the Russian Revolution, and missing jewels.

This was a fun read that had me laughing out loud in parts. The cast of characters isn’t overly large, and each character is well-drawn and distinctive. The secondary characters all have reasons to be suspected of murder, so they add a nice layer of richness and interest to the book.

The mystery is well-crafted and there are plenty of red herrings. I did not guess whodunit until close to the end, and I love it when that happens. Though the story takes place around Christmastime, I don’t think you have to wait until then to read it.

If you like a traditional mystery with all the English countryside tropes and superb characters, this is a good choice. I hope you enjoy it if you pick up your own copy!

Starting with a Classic

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie

A dear friend surprised me recently by sending me a paperback copy of Death on the Nile. It’s been years since I read the book, and I loved re-reading it and finding all the things I missed the first time around. My friend and I were planning to read the book at the same time and compare notes, but we haven’t had a chance to do that yet. I thought I’d begin this new iteration of Reade and Write by offering my thoughts on this classic mystery.

In case you weren’t aware, 20th Century Studios has released a new adaptation of Death on the Nile starring Kenneth Branagh as the famous detective Hercule Poirot. I have not seen the new movie, but I have seen the 1978 version many times. In that star-studded homage to the book, Peter Ustinov played Poirot alongside co-stars ranging from Maggie Smith to David Niven to Bette Davis and many others.

I’m sure you won’t be surprised when I tell you I like the book better.

To summarize briefly: A luxury cruise down the Nile River ends in murder. Three murders, to be precise.

The first murder, in which the victim is a beatiful and fabulously wealthy young woman, is the catalyst that sets off a chain of events culminating in the deaths of two other passengers. As luck would have it, Hercule Poirot, one of the world’s greatest detectives, is on board and is, of course, asked to investigate the crimes and unearth the culprit or culprits. Though most of the action takes place on board the boat, there is a signigicant amount of backstory which takes place on dry land. How fortunate that the intrepid Poirot is present for some of that backstory. As the mystery unfolds, of course, Poirot discovers there are more suspects than anyone realized. His job: solve the crime before the journey ends and a killer gets away.

In case you haven’t guessed it by now, I loved the book.

The most amazing thing about Agatha Christie is her ability to tell the reader something important without the reader ever knowing it. Even having read the book and seen the movie before, there were things I missed. Poirot’s logic is impeccable—and though he may start from the wrong assumption, he has the self-confidence to admit it and change course when necessary.

The pacing in this book is perfect. Christie doles out each juicy clue or piece of information at just the right time, and the action keeps the reader engaged and interested from the first page to the last. I found it a little challenging to keep track of all the characters, but eventually each one gels sufficiently to retain a grasp of who’s who.

If you haven’t read the book and haven’t seen the movie, allow me to suggest that you read the book first! Having seen the movie, I found it hard to separate the actors from the characters in the book. For example, I doubt I’ll ever be able to read the book again without hearing Angela Lansbury’s voice every time Mrs. Salome Otterbourne is speaking. Ditto with Mia Farrow as Jacqueline de Bellefort and Dame Maggie Smith as Miss Bowers.

If you love a great whodunit with a lush Egyptian backdrop, a touch of romance, and an added hint of geopolitical intrigue from the 1930s, grab a copy of this book and settle in for a great read.